Canvas clad Meer lined mystery

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My latest cleanup is a mystery that I hope someone can help me find out more about the maker.
First, let me confess I didn’t touch the canvas covering the bowl, it was mint! The rest of the pipe, well…

I’m sorry I didnt take beforehand pics. From the sellers pics it looked like the rim was totally black with lava and super thick cake, like it was never reamed.
I watched it go several cycles on ebay with no bids so when he cut the price, I got it, even though it wasn’t a Peterson. The only clue of its maker is a jockey on horseback as a logo on the stem.
When I got the pipe, I discovered it had a Meer lining with a normal cake buildup. After a gentle reaming, I softened the build up on the rim with distilled water on a cotton pad. Then 0000 steel wool and sandpaper from 400-1500 to freshen the Meer and bring out the beauty of the thin ring of briar now visible on the rim.
After an oxyclean soak, I sanded the light oxidation and chatter on the stem and really polished it on the buffers. All that’s left to do is freshen the logo. I think I will wait to investigate some new tools to get that small on the logo. It looks like a dental pic is way too big for some logos, including this one.

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Here is a closeup of the stem logo, which is a jockey riding a horse.

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Thanks for checking out my post!

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Refreshing an old Peterson’s X105P

Up for your viewing pleasure is the rebirth of an old Peterson’s pipe. It’s marked Peterson’s London and Dublin and X105 London Made over England. I won’t try to estimate the age but it must have been lightly smoked and stored for many years, maybe in the sunlight. The stem was oxidized so badly that I wondered if vulcanite stems were maybe produced in brown! It looked like a new stem with no tooth chatter, just a medium brown color smooth to the touch. The stummel was fill free but it looked like the finish was totally gone except for a few spots. The rim had some scorch marks with light buildup. The chamber had a thin cake that I reamed a little bit more to smooth it out.

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First order of business is always do the oxyclean soak on the stem while I do the alcohol/cotton ball soak in the bowl. After several hours soaking, the stem was still as brown as ever. Another soak overnight with no change in color, and no white moldy looking oxidation. Scrubbing with barkeepers friend only SLIGHTLY lessened the brown color. But at least I knew it wasn’t a brown stem now, so I wet sanded with 320 paper and up until it was ready for the buffing wheels. The bowl internals were cleaned out after removal from the alcohol soak. I find the tars and gunk are softened enough for easy removal. I used steel wool to clean the scorch marks off of the rim and the rest of the finish from the bowl. Light sanding to make it silky smooth and a wipe down with olive oil followed by a trip to the buffer station. Starting with green tripoli and red tripoli followed by white diamond finishing with carnauba wax and a flannel polish. I find the “magic” really happens with white diamond when buffing a stem. The 2 tripoli bars cut the oxidation down but when you use white diamond compound, it turns to a mirror shine. Well here is the finished pipe, thanks for stopping by!

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Peterson’s Capt. Pete XL21 cleanup

I got this Capt. Pete for a low price because of the condition of the pipe as shown in the seller pics, I have included my own pics instead. Its a thick diamond shanked stubby bulldog canted forward. Well, as can be seen by the pics, this pipe was abused! The stem had plenty of oxidation, the rim had scorch marks front and back that burnt down into the briar. There was a bunch of pock marks on the back of the rim but the worst abuse was a large area chipped off the back. Prepare yourself for graphic photographic evidence…

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I dropped the stem in an oxyclean/hot water bath and scrubbed every half hour with a green sponge. There was minimal chatter which cleaned up with 220 grit paper followed by finer grits until I hit it on the buffer wheels to gloss it up. The brass P was gone so i carved out the P with a dental pick and other small picks under a jewelers loupe and filled with grout whitener, wiping the excess off with my finger before it dried. after drying I waxed it up.

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i reamed the bowl back to a thin cake and gave it an alcohol/cotton ball soak overnight. Next I cleaned the interior of the shank. Then I topped the bowl by rubbing the rim on 220 sandpaper. I had to do this several times, the scorch marks really dug into the rim deep! Upon doing the topping, I discovered a small crack on the rim top and front. i made a small hole at the base of the crack and patched with CA glue.
OKAY, then i tackled the “best” part of the refurb… the back rim. Raw and exposed briar, below that was pock marked with road rash pin holes!
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I used the hot knife trick to steam out about half of the damage. I sanded using 320 paper on the backside slope until i eliminated most of the holes and the chipped area was reduced significantly. I sanded with finer grits and rubbed a dab of olive oil to match the rest of the bowl. I thought i was done, ran it through all the wheels of the buffer and took pics.
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I said heck no, we aren’t done yet. I wasn’t satisfied with the amount of holes still visible in the pics. I mentioned in a comment previously about how when i pull a pipe from my rack to smoke, I see areas that I can improve on from my earlier initial restorations while learning my craft.

So back with the steam, paper, olive oil and buffing. There are now only a FEW pin holes on the slope of the rim which looks close to perfect. You can still see the rim is not perfect but this pipe turned into a real stunner. Thanks for looking!
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